Jobs for English teachers?

Anyone already in Bulgaria who is ready, willing and able to help those coming over? Job vacancies? Employment advice and information? Post it here!

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scot47
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Postby scot47 » Sun Oct 04, 2015 12:32 pm

Life in Bulgaria on a teacher's income is no fun. A graduate of Sofia university teaching in a state school makes around 250 Euros a month after tax and social insurance deductions. Teaching in the private sector may pay a bit more but there will be no pay for months when you are not teaching.

I taught in Bulgaria through the British Council and then at Shumen University. I had to move back to the Middle East because the income was not enough to provide for myself and my dependants.

FlagHostel

Postby FlagHostel » Mon Oct 05, 2015 10:38 am

one at a time please...

mat's right. a bit low scott but no probs.
i will answer for you scott.

i do not work in bg because i do not have to.
i get my income from my rented house in tonbridge, interest off my bulgarian bank account in leva and two websites that i run - with two new ones starting up in january.

anyone else could do the same.
my advice to filip was he is wasting his time thinking of teaching in bg if he is only going to earn 3 euros per hour.

and as you have been teaching yourself scott - remember - you only get paid for the hours you teach.
it's pretty difficult to teach 40 hours a week and have any time left to yourself. you need to do lesson planning and prep as well before each lesson.

you could just make it up as you go along but with filip, as he writing things like 'anyways' - i would not suggest he chanced this unless he teaches
absolute beginners all the time.

then all he needs to learn is the song ' the wheels on the bus go round and round ' and sing it all day, every day.

as i don't work in bg scott, i am able offer house sitting for people for free, as long as they have decent, reliable wifi.

or you can risk getting burgled when you are away. it's your choice.

no fixed address - it doesn't bother me at the moment scott.
in fact, one less thing to worry about.
free house sitting a month at a time is much easier for me.

so that's how life is for an unemployed bum, living in bg.

how is it for you scott - presumably a retired teacher living in bg ?

troyan, i agree with you on spain and barcelona.
it is just full of people talking s h i t e.
but all big cities around the world are the same.

i also agree that 's it difficult to work there, which is why i have never bothered to go there.

but from filip's point of view, first show me a bulgarian girl who lives with a polish guy, anywhere in bulgaria ? i have never met any.
so i doubt it will last 3 months, sorry i mean 3 weeks.

so he'll be a double losser if he stays.

i know the world needs people to work for 3 euros an hour to function.
however, i like polish people and i do not want to see filip just waste his time in bg - that's the reason im giving my advice - but it's up to him of course.

the reason i don't live in poland is because the weather is S H I T and no hot baths there.

this is why i stick around in bg wifi areas.

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Postby mememe » Mon Oct 05, 2015 11:23 am

FlagHostel wrote:you could just make it up as you go along but with filip, as he writing things like 'anyways' - i would not suggest he chanced this unless he teaches absolute beginners all the time.

then all he needs to learn is the song ' the wheels on the bus go round and round ' and sing it all day, every day.

"Anyways" is just an informal style of English - originally an Americanism I believe, described by one person on the 'net as being 'a term used by complete and utter c**ts..." (not suggesting in any way that Filip falls into that category, btw).

But you're right, FlagHostel, although strictly speaking it's not incorrect English, it's not my particular style of English either - along with these complete and utter kn*bheads who finish off any text they write with the plebian offering 'Simples!.... ' :lol:

Yeah - it probably won't be easy Filip. If you want to attract enough students you need to build a good reputation locally as a proficent and affordable teacher of English. Any non-native teacher also usually faces descrimination as a result of not having English as a mother tongue, so rates will also be lower - which as they are low in the first place in BG, can make them rather unattractive.

Can I just ask - when you say you have 'met' this wonderful girl from Sofia, can I just check that you mean 'met' as in face-to-face/going out to different places/having fun together for a semi-prolonged period?

If, alternatively, it was a 'holiday romance' over a relatively short period - then living together or whatever you have planned can be significantly less enjoyable when the drudgery of everyday living and work gets in the way...

I agree with Mat, Jana (or Yana) isn't overly common in Bulgaria (more Russian). However, the next-door neighbour to my apartment in Sofia is called Yana.... Don't think it's her though, as she's married and loves her husband very much.... :D

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Postby scot47 » Mon Oct 05, 2015 6:05 pm

I have not lived in BG for many years, but I did live - and work - there when I was younger.

I stay in touch and still visit. I would not recommend it as a place for teaching. Lousy pay. In my day there were posts through the British-Bulgarian Cultural Exchange. With these, the teacher received a local salary, housing, annual tickets, and a sterling supplement. On a local salary it would simply not be feasible. If you teach in a private school, you will be paid for class contact hours. Slim pickings.

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Postby troyan » Mon Oct 05, 2015 6:09 pm

Well there you have it Filip you wont get an easy ride on this website but there is some good advice built in to the hardened BG veterans

In a nutshell you don't generally head for BG for other than a lifestyle choice,and it is quite rare that a young lady would actually want a prospective partner to go to BG, they are usually heading in the opposite direction or at least want to be.

My advice would be give it a go but don't sacrifice too much or expect anything permanent. But its worth a try, the people advising you here all have great affection towards BG although may not always appear that way.

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Postby scot47 » Mon Oct 05, 2015 6:13 pm

And be aware that there may be some hostility to Poles coming and taking jobs ! Not all Bulgarians are Polonophiles !

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Postby filip_expat » Sun Nov 08, 2015 2:52 pm

Hi there

Long time no see, huh? :D
Thanks very much for all your responses! For now, I'd be making some money providing online mentoring for speak-up.com. Time will tell if there are other job prospects too.

I'm about to move to Bulgaria next week. Yes, my relationship survived. :) And yes, my girl's name is indeed Yana. Is it really more common in Russia? I lived in Ukraine for 2 years and never met any Yana/Jana... :)

Re. Bulgarians not being Polonophiles. Trust me, I've been to countries where the hostility toward Poles was much more of an issue (at least judging by various social research) and never met with any hostile attitude.

Really excited to come to Bulgaria. I guess I need to focus on the more practical aspects of living there.

btw. I never thought there are so many British expats in Bulgaria.
regards,
Filip

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Postby scot47 » Sun Nov 08, 2015 3:39 pm

Many villages have one or two British residents. A recent phenomenon, caused partly by the inflation of property prices in the UK. A suburban house in the SE of England can sell for a million pounds. Even in the provinces, a house can routinely cost £100,000. Compare that to what it costs for a "Selska Kushta" in Bulgaria.

Bulgaria are traditionally divided into Germanophiles and Russophiles. I am not quite sure where Polonia fits in there ! We used to have lots of Polish tourists coming to the Black Sea resorts. There were soecial trains in the summer running from Krakow to Burgas and Varna. They are probably now discontinued.

My connection with Poland is that in the 1960s I made frequent visits top Warsaw in an Exchange Programme between Edi8nburgh University and Warsaw University. Interesting times when Gomulka and then Gierek were still names to reckon with.

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Postby MIK_bg » Sun Nov 08, 2015 4:26 pm

Well I know a bulgarian guy who spent 8 years in Scotland and now he speaks a very good polish...yeah in 8 years working in the fields he barely learned anything in english but since most of the workers were poles...nothing weird.


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