3 Children into school...and 1 refused!

Including 'special needs'.

Moderator: Moderator

User avatar
Photochick
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 64
Location: Blackpool
Contact:

Postby Photochick » Fri Sep 04, 2009 10:01 am

Kazz: I agree with you, but this is the reason the LEA told me SATs are only used in state schools, when I asked if I could arrange for her to sit a SATs test to get some grades on paper. Apparently, if a certain amount of pupils in a school get below a certain grade then 'special measures' can be bought in to improve the school (whatever that means). Obviously, the exams show how well each child does, but this is not the 'purpose' of the tests :roll: I guess the children are given their own results so that can see how they did as individuals, and it can form part of their end of year report. Its the least the LEA can do after all the kids sitting them :D
They also said they are no longer sat in Scotland or Wales and are being phased out in England, so there is no longer one for her age anyway :? If my daughter was in a state school she would have an end of year report with grade for each subject, which would be acceptable to the authorities here. The reports from her private tutors on her GCSE subjects are not being accepted here, as they have to be from a 'UK government body' and cover 'all subjects'.

The American College in VT may provide a way of providing the right documentation, whether its by sitting some exams there, or attending for a while, and I will certainly look into it.

Thanks everyone for the links to solvit. I am aware the current ruling for children 13+ breaks treaties and all sorts of other things (this was pointed out by my LEA who say they have to let all children, from any country, into school), but I suspect that the time and money it would take to go down the legal route would make this a non-starter :-(

The British embassy said that lots of UK families have this problem, and its even worse for American families - hence the American schools and universities that have opened. The situation for British children should improve as Bulgaria gets more into line with EU rulings, but this will take some time.

If it comes to it she can carry on with her UK distance learning and get a good level of education - but it would be such a shame to miss out on the chance to learn the language and culture of Bulgaria, and to make friends her own age. A social life is a normal part of growing up and traveling to the UK to attend events whilst other children are in school here will be.....problematic :? The distance learning college my girls currently use has several students from BG that have been refused entry into school, but none in this area.

I appreciate any suggestions that could help out either with schools in general or alternative social events for children/teens in the VT/Gabrovo region. We really do love it here and I'm just trying to get everyone settled in (not easy with a big family :lol: )

Thanks for all the helpful comments so far.

User avatar
booboo
Super User!
Super User!
Posts: 521
Location: Bulgaria

Postby booboo » Fri Sep 04, 2009 10:15 am

Seedy wrote:This is going to sound VERY hard-hearted, I know, but aren't these the kind of things one investigates thoroughly BEFORE blithely uprooting one's kids and dragging them off to a foreign country?

I imagine that home-schooling may still cause a few problems even in the UK and it's great to read that you have been through this with other kids, since you mention "from birth to university". However, it's all well and good being "desperate" NOW but, unless I've missed something elsewhere, this seems on the face of it to be incredibly irresponsible behaviour. :(

Sorry to sound so harsh, and I'm happy to be put right, but that's how it looks to me right now....



Well said. Totally agree. Its as if some people wake up one day and think 'I know I'll move to Bulgaria'.

Yes its harsh to say it, but IT IS irresponsible to move your child from one school just before GCSE's - a critical time - never mind to a school in a country where she cannot speak the language. So though she will probably have a good social life and plenty of friends, without very good care from here, she is gonna be thick as pudding with no recognised qualifications.

bring on the flack, but you knows its right.

User avatar
Dusty
Super User!
Super User!
Posts: 1074

Postby Dusty » Fri Sep 04, 2009 10:29 am

Booboo - I don't mean to be rude, but have you read the whole thread? It seems a lot of research was done but had some misleading information given. It also sounds as if this family is used to moving around the world. Who are we to criticiaze a person who is just asking for help after being let down by the powers that be. Some good info on this thread for them to follow up which is more constructive than criticism.

User avatar
Photochick
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 64
Location: Blackpool
Contact:

Postby Photochick » Fri Sep 04, 2009 11:23 am

BooBoo - you seem to have missed the point a little. None of my children have been taken out of school, and none of their qualifacations will be effected in the slightest.

All my children have been home educated and have done well. They are aged 0 -21 - so there would never be a good time to move if they were in mainstream schooling. These are the first of mine that are doing GCSE's the (others went straight for uni entrance exams at 17) and are studying by distance learning anyway. We work in a lot of countries we wouldn't consider living in (like UAE), but think Bulgaria is a great place for children.

Even if my 13yo gets into school here, she will still sit her GCSE's next summer as arranged, and would hope to start uni at 17. If she goes to school here, she will leave starting uni till 18, so she can complete school here too. (I guess if she was in UK school she would have couple of years before she sat her GCSE's?). She certainly won't be 'as thick as a pudding' lol

(And before anyone criticizes me for having a big family - as it seems to be my day for taking flack :wink: .....we aren't on benefits, we both work, and our children are happy and well provided for bunch. We payed (still pay) all UK taxes etc ...but don't use resources like the state education system or the NHS. In short, we aren't doing anyone any harm!) :wink:

User avatar
thedichingang
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 164
Location: Dichin village

Postby thedichingang » Fri Sep 04, 2009 11:31 am

hi photochick
some great stuff on your website.

off at a slight tangent to the main thrust of your topic.
i wonder if your efforts should now be focused on completing arrangements for the continuation of home learning here in BG. also as suggested by others continue with an examination of education rights issues EU/bulgaria ( it could take years for full implementation of EU stuff here in BG) BUT the rights and recognition of accepted educational practises/methods/stlyes etc supported in the EU will eventually prevail.

my main thought here ( retired teacher) i personally always had some concern regarding social interaction for children who are home educated; having said that i regularly in the uk dealt with issues relating to bullying etc. bullying does exist here in BG and i know that some teachers hold the view it is not within their remit to sort this out. so beware the 'social interaction' experience which may be awaiting your older daughter.

i note the area you are living in and would also add have you considered visiting any of the various establishments located in veliko tarnovo for recreational & creative pursuits. I personally only have experience of art/pottery/ceramics (our 12year old g-daughter attends) but there are many organisations about. also many good bulgarian students who have part-time work as teachers of bulgarian.

if contact for the children is not to be had via the school route then try the social aspect. feel free to pm if you wish

good luck

john

User avatar
Photochick
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 64
Location: Blackpool
Contact:

Postby Photochick » Fri Sep 04, 2009 11:37 am

Gimlet: Good point! Maybe she'll have to do her driving test when shes at uni in the UK?
Jinx57:It wasn't just you Brandi was accusing of lying - she also insisted that the government lady from sofa and the lady from the Bulgarian embassy I met were not bulgarian officials - lol. Thanks for the link about Samlearning, all info shared can help. My situation is a little different from yours as my daughter is already doing her GCSEs by distance learning. She is the 4th eldest, and we have been home schooling for quite a long time, so I am not worried about her actual education, just the situation here, as it appears school is a big part of childrens social life in BG. We would like to spend a lot of our time here, eventually transferring our businesses from the UK to BG if it works out :)

User avatar
B52
Mega User!
Mega User!
Posts: 1514
Location: Varna Region

Postby B52 » Fri Sep 04, 2009 12:12 pm

No flack here photochick. Can’t offer any answers but it sounds to me as if both parents and kids have got their heads screwed on ok.

I know several adults and children that were home schooled and, perhaps in spite of the lack of contact in a formal school setting, they tend to be the more intelligent, in a worldly wise sense, the more entrepreneurial, the more artistic, the more free thinking, the more engaging.

I also know several that were schooled where they travelled with their parents and I would say the same about them (including my nieces whose dad was in the oil business).

The nice thing is that they can all articulate well, spell, use correct grammar and have at least a grasp of other languages, unlike most of those that stay at home and do nothing and that are spewed out of the formal education system.

User avatar
eureka
Super User!
Super User!
Posts: 437
Location: DOBRICH

Postby eureka » Fri Sep 04, 2009 4:05 pm

Photochick wrote:
If anyone has ANY ideas or suggestions I would love to hear from them. We are now desperate enough to try ANYTHING now.



Send an email to Boyko....

Seriously, I would. It is not acceptable at all that your child is refused an education in a "Modern European Country" in the 21st century because of red tape. Of course there has to be rules and regulations that apply to all walks of life, but this particular case appears to me to be an EXCEPTION TO THE RULE that is indeed being caught up in senseless red tape.


The new Bulgarian government has appointed a minister with responsibility for Bulgarians overseas. I have no doubt the the new government would be abhorred if a Bulgarian child residing in another EU state was denied an education on the basis of the lack of nonexisting paperwork.

The irony that attending school is a legal requirement for children in Bulgaria, whilst at the same time your child is being legally prohibited from attending school should not be lost on the powers that be!



Google the GERB party and get an email address for Boyko Borisov.

User avatar
booboo
Super User!
Super User!
Posts: 521
Location: Bulgaria

Postby booboo » Fri Sep 04, 2009 6:04 pm

First of all if I missed the point I apologise.....but at 17 or 18 which UNI will she go to?? A bulgarian one?

And although this won't necessarily be the most popular post ever...why do you think Bulgaria - from an education point of view - is a good place to bring kids up?

Without expressing too much where would you put british ppl's IQ levels in relation to BG counterparts?It's only a question

In my opinion they might be the nicest in the world but they aren't the - well it rhymes with it so enough said.

It's a subject for a whole new topic BUT I will just say customer service and rip you off today and dont worry tomorrow...the latter I have been smart enough to avoid, though 'ENGLISH' real estate agents try their best...losers

I wish you the best of luck and surely having decided to move to Bulgaria with children you have already taught them at least 60% of the language?

User avatar
Seedy
Mega User!
Mega User!
Posts: 2252
Location: Sofia/Dupnitsa/Lincs/

Postby Seedy » Fri Sep 04, 2009 7:16 pm

Booboo, what on earth are you waffling on about?

Your comments, if they were actually comprehensible, would seem to verge on racism. If you have something sensible to say, may I suggest that you spell it out for those of us whose IQs are obviously not up to the mark?


Return to “Schools and Education”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest