12 Volt Solar Panels

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leedarkwood
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Postby leedarkwood » Tue Mar 24, 2009 7:42 am

Kaolin division kicks off solar panel production



Solarpro, a unit of Bulgarian miner Kaolin, has launched production of photovoltaic (PV) solar panels at its factory in Silistra, on the Danube.

The first batch was out at the beginning of March.

During the fifth International Congress on Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Sources, and the specialised energy efficiency exhibition, which will run simultaneously in Sofia from April 6 to 8, Solarpro will have a 504 MWp PV power station in front of Sofia’s National Palace of Culture.

Solarpro is the biggest solar plant factory on the Balkans, with a nameplate capacity of 18 MW. The company came into being in end-2007 in line with a strategy of its owner to bolster energy efficiency and reduce dependence on fossil fuels. In March 2009 Solarpro’s capital was raised by BGN 6 million, all of it subscribed by the majority owner.

In early 2009 Solarpro won a contract to build and install a 2.4 MWp solar power station in the village of Yankovo, eastern Bulgaria.

Many financial institutions offer support to help meet the relatively high initial costs of PV solar systems. For example, UniCredit Bulbank recently rolled out an investment loan for solar power plants, which is also available to start-ups.

http://news.dnevnik.bg/?y=2009&m=3&d=23

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dylan
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Postby dylan » Mon May 03, 2010 3:53 pm

I have been asked to try to find out how much it would cost to buy a solar panel that gathers enough energy to run a battery for a caravan in the evenings. Firstly i dont have a clue about solar panels or the workings of them so all i need is the answer if it is possible and how much it costs here in bg. I suppose they want to watch tv and have a small fridge on and say one light at a time. so please nothing to complicated but just point me in the right direction if you can please. dylan

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mememe
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Postby mememe » Mon May 03, 2010 7:05 pm

Hi Dylan!

Here's a couple of calculation sites for starters:-

http://rvsolarpanels.wordpress.com/cate ... alculator/

and

http://www.mrsolar.com/page/msos/sizingindustrial

(Power consumption for appliances should generally be shown somewhere on a label)

As regards supply/installation cost and possible suppliers in BG - I'm sorry, I haven't a clue..... but I'm sure someone else will be able to help soon.

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dylan
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Postby dylan » Mon May 03, 2010 9:18 pm

Hi Mememe, fasinating stuff if you can understand it and not having a laugh here, thanks for your reply. I will forward on any useful information. I feel like a complete novice asking for this information. I thought it was just a case of buying a product and switching it on. How wrong am i ? Buy this system for x amount , turn it on and get free electric for a few hours and start again the next day , if the sun is shining. :D is it not as easy as that ? you pay your money and away you go . We have solar lights in the garden and they come on every night without fail ,no cost no problem, batteries included :) I just want to say , hey yes, you can buy a system for x amount and it will power a battery for a certain ammount of time and run your tv etc., as long as the sun shines that day. please reply with any further info. dylan.

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Postby Slaphead » Mon May 03, 2010 9:43 pm

dylan wrote:Hi Mememe, fasinating stuff if you can understand it and not having a laugh here, thanks for your reply. I will forward on any useful information. I feel like a complete novice asking for this information. I thought it was just a case of buying a product and switching it on. How wrong am i ? Buy this system for x amount , turn it on and get free electric for a few hours and start again the next day , if the sun is shining. :D is it not as easy as that ? you pay your money and away you go . We have solar lights in the garden and they come on every night without fail ,no cost no problem, batteries included :) I just want to say , hey yes, you can buy a system for x amount and it will power a battery for a certain ammount of time and run your tv etc., as long as the sun shines that day. please reply with any further info. dylan.


Well, yes. Photovoltaic cells.
They will produce electricity as long as there is daylight, they don't need bright sunshine. However, they do work better when the day is bright.
Just because you get full sunshine and 35 degrees plus, doesn't mean you'll get more electricity.
If you're looking for return on investment, forget photovoltaic cells (at the moment). Install a black pipe system instead to produce all the hot water you'll ever need. Far more cost efficient.

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Postby Hippyboy » Tue May 04, 2010 12:32 am

OK so PV panels aren't cost effective if you have access to mains electricity , however on Seathrift's yacht , or in YankV8's camper or Dylan's friend's caravan they're ideal if there's no mains hook-up available . Of course its always great to have to have the best deep-cycle batteries and electronic regulation/control systems available as Seathrift describes , but will you use it enough to make it worthwhile ; I met a Grman couple who had a cool system in their camper which they said had always kept them 'powered-up' even in winter in Northern Europe , it had cost them a grand but they lived in their camper so it was worth it . It is possible to run a more basic system , I've seen them whilst trekking in the Himmalayas and imagine that they're used in other remote parts of the world . There in Ladakh the authorities had supplied every household with a panel , a heavy-duty battery and a basic regulator for a nominal $20. The ones I saw were filthy (nobody told them to keep them clean) balanced precariously on some broken bricks on the roof vaguely pointing towards the sun and connected with a few pieces of thin wire twisted together , but nevertheless they could power a small 12v striplight and a radio , and recharge a torch if you were lucky enough to have one , which was all pretty amazing if you happen to live half a days walk over the mountains from the nearest shop to buy batteries from . If you want to do a 'budget' version in Europe running a couple of 12v lights and some music the difficulty maybe finding a cheap regulator/control box . As a back-up in case of power cuts you'ld be better off with rechargeable lanterns or hurricane lamps and live without the computer . Tim .

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AnimalRower
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installing Small system

Postby AnimalRower » Tue May 04, 2010 7:14 am

Hi Everyone,

Very informative indeed. I am about to install a system in my own property to run as much of the household electrical appliances as possible. Avoiding the monsters such as kettles, boilers washing machines etc. This is in an effort to cut our monthly bills.

I have purchased the the solar cells directly from the United States and will be building the panels with my electrician colleague. I will be using a small inverter and a mix of second hand car batteries with an inverter and charge controller in the mix.

This is very much going to be a suck it and see project but will avoid the issue of large costs outwieghing the benefits.

If this works out ok we may even start producing panels for sale.

The panels I will be using will be:

18v 55w ones and I will have four of them.

I will keep everyone informed on my progres with hopefully very positive posts ;-)

Thanks

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Moscow_Wolf
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Re: installing Small system

Postby Moscow_Wolf » Tue May 04, 2010 10:17 am

AnimalRower wrote:Hi Everyone,

Very informative indeed. I am about to install a system in my own property to run as much of the household electrical appliances as possible. Avoiding the monsters such as kettles, boilers washing machines etc. This is in an effort to cut our monthly bills.

I have purchased the the solar cells directly from the United States and will be building the panels with my electrician colleague. I will be using a small inverter and a mix of second hand car batteries with an inverter and charge controller in the mix.

This is very much going to be a suck it and see project but will avoid the issue of large costs outwieghing the benefits.

If this works out ok we may even start producing panels for sale.

The panels I will be using will be:

18v 55w ones and I will have four of them.

I will keep everyone informed on my progres with hopefully very positive posts ;-)

Thanks


Some photographs of the project would be fantastic too.

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Seedy
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Postby Seedy » Tue May 04, 2010 12:22 pm

When I installed my system in France I managed to source some unused ex-nuclear sub batteries - real monsters but very cheap at the time. I guess that if you ferret around you MIGHT be able to find some for sale still; go for the empty ones but be prepared for some questions as to why you need so much sulphuric acid (500 litres in my case! :lol: )

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Hippyboy
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Postby Hippyboy » Tue May 04, 2010 11:11 pm

Hi AnimalR , fair play if you wanna construct your own panels but unless you can source some batteries like Seedy did why bother with an inverter ? There's loads of good 12v DC lights and sound/video equipment around , in fact most amps, CD/DVD players etc. have a transformer inside them dropping down from mains voltage AC to 12v DC so inverting is just wasting the power that you've generated . Dunno about you but my electric bils are 15-30 lev a month so I couldn't imagine saving that much with a solar system . Tim .


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