Bulgarian Solicitors (all areas)

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Cabbage
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Postby Cabbage » Mon Apr 20, 2009 11:24 pm

indesec wrote:I`m wondering how you can only sign documents in English, In law, the countries language takes precedence.


In Bulgaria that's correct only if we talk of official documents. Private documents (such as preliminary contracts for example) could be in English.

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Cabbage
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Postby Cabbage » Mon Apr 20, 2009 11:27 pm

B52 wrote: to hire an authorised (?) interpreter


No authorisation is needed. Anyone could be interpreter as long as he speaks English well and is not interested, for example is not a party to the contract that is interpreted or is not the person empowered by the POA that's interpreted.

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Cabbage
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Postby Cabbage » Mon Apr 20, 2009 11:32 pm

Rocky7 wrote:You can sign documents in English and have them translated into Bulgarian.


If these documents are private ones, no translation into Bulgarian is required by the law.

Rocky7 wrote:When a contract has the bulgarian version on the left of the page and the english version on the right and both versions are signed then of course the Bulgarian version is going to take precident.


Only if this is expressly said in the text. Otherwise it would not be obvious which version takes precedent if there's contradiction.

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B52
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Postby B52 » Tue Apr 21, 2009 8:37 am

Rocky7 said…
If you can't trust a Lawyer to sign documents at the notary on your behalf then why trust a translator to explain to you what is written in Bulgarian. I know which is the worst option.


By your tone, I assume you mean the interpreter. In my experience, it would be the lawyer.

Cabbage said..
No authorisation is needed.


Anyway, thank you Cabbage for clearing that up. I thought that was correct. However, every time we have used an interpreter, they have had an "official" card recognising them as such. Obviously, just coincidence and why I put the (?).

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kazz
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Postby kazz » Tue Apr 21, 2009 10:24 am

My understanding is that when you use an interpreter at the notaries it is actually the notary who is employing them even though it's you who pay!

I think that under Bulgarian law it is the notary who is obliged to ensure that you understand what you are signing, so it's they who have to be satisfied with the competence of the translator.
This is not to suggest that the Notaries legal obligations discharges you from using your own 'due caution'.
Some Notaries insist on sworn translators, most in my experience do not.

We always take our own translator; the notary we use is happy to use her even though she isn't 'sworn'. I'm happy to use her because I know her loyalty is with me, she'll take the time to question anything she's unclear about and I know where she lives!
All of the above are more important to me than a card, piece of paper or registration to say that someone is competent to translate.

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FJM
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Notary

Postby FJM » Tue Apr 21, 2009 3:45 pm

I thought the role of a notary was to serve the public as
an impartial and unbiased witness by identifying
the people who come before him/her. Usually to prevent
fraud by attesting that a person actually signed
a document.

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FJM
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Postby FJM » Tue Apr 21, 2009 3:57 pm

Rocky7 wrote:There is a thread on this forum dedicated to www.gsgeorgieva.co.uk and all the users who have posted there think they are great.

I have quickly read through this thread and have realised that a lot of users are missing the point. Why ask for a lawyer that can speak good english? There is no point. When deeling with lawyers and paperwork there is only one thing that matters and that is what is written. It is far more important that your lawyer has excellent written English.

Yes, it is nice to have a lovely conversation in English and you can tell your lawyer what your intentions are but what happens when they turn round and tell you to sign a document that is in Bulgarian. You will not have a clue what you are signing and all what has been said will become irrelevant as all that matters is what you are signing. As far as I'm concerned every word that is written has to be in perfect English otherwise it is meaningless and open to other interpretations.

For a Bulgarian to write perfect English it is extremely hard and even proffessional Bulgarian translators get it wrong. There was one called Oracle on this forum and when you read her posts you will see what I mean. If you can find a lawyer that has good written English and will only expect you to sign documents in English then in my opinion this is what to look for in a lawyer. If a lawyer tells you to sign something you cannot understand or read then they are basically having a laugh at your expense.


Rocky, i can confirm that this Lawyer not only speaks good english, even if she does have a bit of a "Geordie" accent, but also writes without spelling mistakes and even punctuation, which is more than i can say for myself"!,.
As long as you understand "whey aye" is yes!

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LUCI
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Postby LUCI » Tue Apr 21, 2009 4:46 pm

its actually a Northumbrian accent.....there is a subtle difference!

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Rocky7
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Postby Rocky7 » Tue Apr 21, 2009 7:38 pm

FJM wrote:Rocky, i can confirm that this Lawyer not only speaks good english, even if she does have a bit of a "Geordie" accent, but also writes without spelling mistakes and even punctuation.
If a lawyer has spent the time to learn how to write good understandable English then it indicates to me that they are genuine people with more interests than just earning as much money as they can, IMHO. If a lawyer cannot write good English that would stand up legally, should he really be representing an English client?

Cheers B52, I didn't know the difference between a translator and interpreter but I do now.

Using an interpreter at something as important as the notary is a bit risky. What happens if they get it wrong. It's not their money on the line. You can't sue them or discredit them as you have no proof of how they interpreted the documents. The spoken word is worthless, that is why everything is put in writting. If everything has to be in writing, why use an interpreter? They use words which are worthless. It seems to make a mokery of using an interpreter.

If, in my customer service job, a Bulgarian came to me for my service and I gave him some documents to sign in English while someone was there to interpret what was written for him, I know this would not work. Yes, my back would be covered because I would have his signature and his money so why would I care if he signed something on a misunderstanding. It's his money which is now mine so I couldn't care less if he has been deceived. The interpreter couldn't care less either because he has been paid and there is nothing in writing to incriminate him. Everybody is happy, including my customer who is blisfully unaware that he might have been deceived.

If on the other hand this Bulgarian customer of mine empowers someone through a POA to gain my service then the person who has the POA is responsible if the Bugarian doesn't get what the POA states and will be liable. If my service is substandard and I do not give what the translated POA states then I am liable. My customer cannot be decieved because everything is in writing and every party involved is made responsible.

The point is, when everything is in writing then the customer is protected to the extent which he has protected himself in writing. If customer wants to rely on an interpreter he could be deceived.

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Rocky7
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Postby Rocky7 » Tue Apr 21, 2009 8:18 pm

Cabbage wrote:
indesec wrote:I`m wondering how you can only sign documents in English, In law, the countries language takes precedence.
In Bulgaria that's correct only if we talk of official documents. Private documents (such as preliminary contracts for example) could be in English.
So, there is no excuse for REMs to use POAs that are written in Bulgarian, they can all be in English.


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