Tick Warning # 2

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Memsahib
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Tick Warning # 2

Postby Memsahib » Sun May 31, 2009 5:22 am

This topic continues from:
http://www.mybulgaria.info/modules.php? ... c&start=49




We used Bob Martins "Spot On" for years in Scotland on all of our dogs as our vet there said "Frontline" may not be suitable for dogs with certain health problems and some dogs have an allergic reaction to it. Our Westie had a slight heart murmur. We used to go to the Highlands every weekend to our caravan and had no problem with ticks etc.

Jo

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leedarkwood
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Postby leedarkwood » Sun May 31, 2009 5:53 am

Update on the medicine that the vet gave us. It cost 6 leva for a small bottle, containing a milky fluid. You mix this with 10 liters of water, and spray it on dogs, bedding and generally round the area. Our stray, a nine month ish old hunting dog, wouldn't tolerant the noise of the spray so we sponged it on to him. Within an hour the ticks were dead and you could comb them off, heads and all. I am quite impressed, compared with the difficulty of taking live ticks off animals I think it would be worth keeping this stuff to hand. The stuff is called Aiken, АИКЪН. You do it again after 3 weeks.

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freddie
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ticks

Postby freddie » Sun May 31, 2009 7:00 am

i think people should be aware how serious ticks are.we have friend in bg who was "bit" by one, tried to remove it himself, he is now in intensive care in dobrich hospital,he caught an infectious decease that almost killed him.the advice from the hospital was, if you get a tick go to the hospital and have it removed.and you will be given a course of antibiotics.thanks lee for your advice on ticks,

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Postby leedarkwood » Sun May 31, 2009 9:02 am

I asked my vet about ticks and humans, being aware of the terrible diseases you can get from them, and he said that it takes several hours for the 'bugs' to cross from the tick to you. So yes, I agree that if you can, it might well be best to get them removed professionally, but don't panic if that would take a little time to do so.

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Cameo
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Postby Cameo » Sun May 31, 2009 4:57 pm

We Frontline our cat regularly and so was suprised to see a tick on him the other day. It was by his ear so very easy to see and keep an eye on. I had read on here that if you smother the tick in vasaline then it bungs up its breathing hole (which apparently is in its bum! ). Anyway, got out the vasaline but the flippin cat would not have it on him and spent the next half house fastidiously cleaning the area, so the tick ended up the cleanest tick in Bulgaria.

Anyway, we decided to just leave the tick to suck the blood, fill up and then fall off naturally. Several hours later the tick is still in the same place and no bigger......strange. So got a magnifying glass and had a look at the blighter close up. And the thing was very close to the skin but not actually attached, so I just got hold of it and slid it off. So apparently the Frontline stuff had worked in the first place. The tick got on the cat, started to drink the blood and died from doing so.

So its Frontline for the cat now on a permenant basis. Now........ do they make it for humans.

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Postby dylan » Mon Jun 01, 2009 8:58 am

www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/ehrlichia/Q&A/Q&A.htm lots of info on ticks here. dylan

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jinx57
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Postby jinx57 » Mon Jun 01, 2009 9:03 am

Cameo wrote:
So apparently the Frontline stuff had worked in the first place. The tick got on the cat, started to drink the blood and died from doing so.

So its Frontline for the cat now on a permenant basis. Now........ do they make it for humans.


hmmmm.... the nit remedy stocked by the abtekas for the kids is absolutely lethal.... nearly passed out administering it! Maybe frontline would be safer!

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Postby scot47 » Mon Jun 01, 2009 9:35 am

Tickes are nasty and best avoided. However I have not yet come across one case of Tick-borne Encephalitis. Have any other posters encountered ANYONE who has experienced it ?

In the 1990's when I worked for the British Council there was a scare emanating from Head Office in London. Everyone had to be vaccinated. Bulgarians dismissed the whole thing as nonsense. I see the scare about TBE comes up periodically.
Last edited by scot47 on Mon Jun 01, 2009 10:42 am, edited 1 time in total.

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mihangel
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Postby mihangel » Mon Jun 01, 2009 10:24 am

A large map of Europe showing the main risk areas for Tick-borne Encephalitis is available here:
http://www.tbe-info.com/upload/medialib ... h91552.jpg

No information is available for Bulgaria or Romania, and this is indicated on the map by yellow question marks ?. It looks to me like Bulgaria is way south of the main areas, which sweep from southern Germany through Czech-Slovakia, Austria, Hungary, Poland and on up into Russia.

A list of reported cases in Europe up until 2006 is here: (Note that Bulgaria isn't even mentioned, and Albania has had no information since 1990.)
http://www.tbe-info.com/upload/medialib ... _cases.jpg

Gushter's famous post here lists the main dangers in Bulgaria:
http://www.mybulgaria.info/modules.php? ... sc&start=7

We have Marseille Fever, Lyme Disease, Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever and Q Fever. That's quite enough! We don't need TBE as well!

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DANNIA
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Postby DANNIA » Fri Jun 05, 2009 7:22 am

We heard sad news last night, when our friend in Saransko told us that her staffie was very poorly after being bitten by either a tick, horsefly or other insect.

On Tuesday our friend noticed that her dog was very lethargic and she put it down to the heat but unfortunately her dog collapsed on Wednesday night, so she took her to the vet in Yambol yesterday morning, Maria, who said it is virtually undetectable in a well looked after dog, but easily treated with antibiotics, and should see an improvement within 2 days.

Sadly, the dog died shortly after we were told this news last night.
She was on a course of antibiotics but it was too late, she died of blood poisoning.
She was 15 years old, but in good shape for her age, but whether this was a contributory factor I don't know.

A 5 leva test done as soon as signs of looking off colour can detect it, and hopefully save your dogs life.

Nikki


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