Bulgarian Elastoplast Warning!!

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ERICAANDJOHN
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Glue??

Postby ERICAANDJOHN » Mon Jul 04, 2011 10:40 pm

Hi All, We had a nasty incident a couple of years ago when we were over visting and one of our young vistiors caught his face on some really old barbed wire, Lucky for us we had some special glue with us we had bought from the pound shop in england made by compead you can also buy it for around seven pounds in boots. we used wet wipes to clean him up and this glue which you drop onto a special cotton bud and this stitched him up till he got home to England, He then went to casualty where they said it was a great job. I can highly recommend having this in your first aid box. hope this helps someone

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AngloBulgarian

Postby AngloBulgarian » Mon Jul 04, 2011 11:08 pm

Hi

I looked up compead but could only find blister patches etc. as you might have guessed im they kinda guy that needs medical supplies readily to hand. Do you have any more info??

There was lots of stuff about people using Superglue to affix compead.

Anyway here is AB's advice for super-gluing yourself back together:

1) Clean wound with alcohol or vodka etc and make sure you have all the bits of gravel etc out - dig deep as they hide in the blood and stuff, if it hurts too much get some NO SPAR (keep these in stock) tablets and crush them, there basically Novocaine, rub the powder into the wound and it will numb it - dont cut any seemingly surplus bits of flesh off as when you come to glue you will be missing bits

2) Apply heavy pressure with kitchen role etc for a good few mins to stem the blood flow temporarily

3) Open superglue with one hand and your teeth, making sure not to glue your teeth together, immediately you remove the swab run a line of glue along the outer edge of the wound (NOT inside the wound - it will stick but will prevent the healing process) and press the outer edges together slightly. Dont create a kink in the flesh as that will pull the flesh off the surrounding area.

4) This should have been no.1 - buy expensive superglue, the £1 stuff is crap as is the £6 UK Locktite (they had to make it weaker as people like me were turning up to A&E with there fingers stuck to there tongs) Buy the BG'n locktite liquid (not the gel) its fantastic and will hold a really bad cut closed for 48hrs (i know)

5) At this point you really should go and get the thing stitched - if it was bad enough to need super-gluing it really probably needs medical attention

I guess the average person can go months, maybe even years without having to glue themselves back together but its seriously always worth having some in and some serious anesthetic. You never know when that lawn mower will find your toe!!

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Postby gimlet » Tue Jul 05, 2011 3:07 am

URGO elastoplast is French.

http://www.urgo.com/

Just seemed a bit unfair the Bulgarians should get the blame for another rip off :D

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Postby ardleystar » Tue Jul 05, 2011 7:18 am

Info for AB

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Duo-Surgical-Ad ... B000TC2PP2

Tissue adhesive

Tissue adhesive (cyanoacrylate adhesive or surgical glue) has been available since the 1950s and has become increasingly popular as a wound-closure method in emergency settings. It achieves good cosmetic results (Farion et al, 2003) and results in low wound complication rates (Applebaum et al, 1993). The glue is supplied in small, single-use ampoules, which should not be resealed or reused, and has been shown on many occasions to be an acceptable alternative to sutures for simple, traumatic lacerations.

The glue is easy to apply from the sterile single-use vial in which it is supplied. The opened vial is squeezed gently to either spread a thin line of adhesive along the length of the clean, dry wound or to 'spot-weld' the wound by applying a series of dots along its length. The wound needs to be held together for 30 seconds to allow polymerisation to occur.

Gluing wounds is easy to perfect and the procedure is relatively painless (though polymerisation releases heat, which some patients find uncomfortable).

It is quicker than suturing or using adhesive strips and, as no local anaesthetic is needed, there is no danger of needlestick injury. The glue provides a waterproof seal and helps to prevent contamination with dirt and bacteria.

Disadvantages

There has been much debate about the cost-effectiveness of this wound-closure method. Balanced against the relatively high cost of the glue itself is the fact that no instrument or local anaesthetic are required.

There are cost savings in terms of nursing time and, also, there is no need for the patient to return for removal of the glue since it will rub off when healing is complete. However, there is a slight increase in the rate of wound dehiscence with tissue adhesive compared with standard wound-closure methods (Farion et al, 2003).

Glue is not generally suitable over joints and areas of high tension as the adhesive can break and it is not useful where frequent washing is necessary as it peels off. It is not usually considered as a management option for extensive or complex wounds.

In the emergency setting, it is uncommon to repair deep tissue layers using adhesive and this restricts the use of this closure method to superficial wound layers.

It is possible to remove and reapply the glue if a mistake is made, but it is preferable not to do so and the assistance of another person to approximate the skin edges may be necessary.

Staples

Skin staples have been available for many years and are supplied in disposable, single-use sterile packs. To insert staples, the stapler is placed over the carefully apposed edges of a cleaned wound - if possible with the edges slightly everted. The handle is squeezed to release the staple into the wound.

Excessive pressure on the skin should be avoided as it may cause a poor cosmetic result and may make staple removal difficult. Staples are placed at intervals along the length of the wound. Once healing is achieved, the staples are removed with a special remover tool. Patient comfort and cosmetic results are similar to those achieved in sutured wounds.

Stapling is a quick method of wound closure and offers a low level of tissue reactivity and better resistance to infection than use of sutures (Edlich and Reddy, 2001).

Stapling can be performed without local anaesthetic and this reduces the risk of needlestick injury. Ritchie and Rocke (1989) believe this makes it safer for the user and so they advocate its use on these grounds.

However, some patients may not tolerate stapling without the use of local anaesthetic.

Several studies report the usefulness of stapling as a wound-closure method for simple scalp wounds in children (Khan et al, 2002; Kanegaye et al, 1997).

Disadvantages

Staples are more expensive than sutures, particularly when local anaesthetic is used and when removal costs are considered.

MacGregor et al (1989) suggest that this is outweighed by the simplicity of the method and safety factors. However, McClelland and Nellis (1997) noted that the cost was enough to restrict the use of staples within their A&E department to wounds where there was a risk of needlestick injury (such as with confused, agitated or violent patients).

Skill is required to insert staples and failing to align tissue edges correctly can cause scar deformity. Staples will only close superficial skin layers; sutures may be necessary to approximate deeper tissues within a wound.

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compeed

Postby ERICAANDJOHN » Tue Jul 05, 2011 7:31 am

Hi its called compeed liquid bandage you can buy it from pound shops,and here

http://www.webchemist.co.uk/Pharmacy/54 ... _25ml.aspx

also have to say the person I glued was in a mess and the skin was draping open like a huge teardrop it was on his face and going from just under his eye down his check about 2-3 inches I am not exagerating I promise I used this and there is no scar visible now. my daughter whos boyfriend it was has said it was a nightmare and it was like the worst horror film ever seen, it was at the time.

you get a little bottle of glue and about ten cotton buds which you have to use with it.

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AngloBulgarian

Postby AngloBulgarian » Tue Jul 05, 2011 9:30 am

Thanks ERICAANDJOHN

I will buy some as i guess its better to use a product designed for that purpose rather than something from Praktika, even if it does work!!

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Postby brianj42 » Tue Jul 05, 2011 9:51 am

Happen they were impliments of torture during the "Good Old Days" ? Sticking them on victims private parts and then ripping them off.

Someone found a warehouse full and hey presto, sticking plasters :lol:

I have this vision in my head of them testing them in the lab. First person rushed off to hospital in sheer agony.

Tone down the stickiness, 2nd person ruched to hospital in slightly less agony.

No other volunteers came forward so they launch the product. :lol:

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Postby kazz » Tue Jul 05, 2011 10:55 am

When my son-in-law first told me about superglue for wounds I thought he was joking. In fact I think this is what it was first developed for. I'd guess that when produced for use on people rather than things it's produced in more sterile conditions but I don't know if the actual compound used is different (apart from the strength).
I know many climbers tend to carry it as part of their first aid kit, I don't know if I'd be brave enough to use it.
I did bring back some 'steri-strips' from the UK last time I was there. Very expensive (about 6 quid for 20 I think) But there're times when they're so much better than a plaster...and they don't tear holes in your skin on removal!
Ideal for deepish flesh wounds (after cleaning) when you just want to hold it together for those first few days so healing can start with the skin in the right place.

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Postby truckyboy » Tue Jul 05, 2011 4:24 pm

A very interesting post, now seeing as my wife likes to have a good nag from time to time...its given me a very good idea to stop her.. :lol: :lol:


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