Snakes

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rodz
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snakes

Postby rodz » Mon Apr 25, 2011 8:47 am

I have searched the net for a couple of days and cant find this snake Yes I agree with you Millgirl by its colours make it dangerous. Usually in nature black and red meen danger

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Moscow_Wolf
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Re: snakes

Postby Moscow_Wolf » Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:07 am

rodz wrote:I have searched the net for a couple of days and cant find this snake Yes I agree with you Millgirl by its colours make it dangerous. Usually in nature black and red meen danger


Nearest I can find is the common adder although, RED Zig Zag markings seem unusual? I'm actually surprised that so many species of the same snake can have so many different colourings and markings.

The most common member of its family and indeed one of the most common European snakes, being found not only in mainland Europe but also in Great Britain, Scandinavia and even beyond the Arctic Circle. Its success, like that of many wide-ranging species, can be attributed to its catholicity of habitats and altitudes. Adders are found from sea level to up to 3,000 m high, in the edges of woods or in clearings, in peat-bogs or hedgerows or near water. Like many European lacertids an individual will always remain in the same location.

They do not require a great deal of heat, and in fact during the warmest parts of the year adders switch from diurnal to crepuscular (dusk and dawn) or nocturnal behaviour. They shelter in vole burrows or beneath piles of stones or roots, especially bushes. They are also good swimmers and can cross wide rivers and lakes. Prey is mainly small rodents, frogs and toads, plus nestling birds and lizards, notably the Viviparous Lizard which often occurs in the same sort of habitat and at similar cool latitudes. Like all vipers, adders are venomous, and while the poison is not normally dangerous to humans medical attention should be sought if bitten.

It is largely this poison factor that led until recently to the persecution of this beneficial animal, at least in the UK. Hibernation is from October to April, dependent on the weather: adders may hibernate singly or in small groups, or occasionally in very large congregations of up to several hundred. Mating takes place in spring and about three months later 8-12 young, about 6" long, are born. These prey on earthworms, insects and smaller lizards. It is noteworthy that in the northern part of its range, the adder does not breed every year.

Adders display a degree of sexual dichroism in that males are normally black while females have been described as "russet red". Both usually carry the characteristic zigzag markings down the back, but some plain black or red individuals occur. Scales across body: 21 (occasionally 19 or 23). Ventral scales: 132-158. Subcaudal scales: 24-26. Brood size: 8-12, summer.
V. b. bosniensis Balkan mountains.

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Postby Norman-D-Beeches » Tue Apr 26, 2011 11:23 am

Out for a stroll one early spring, in North Devon a few years ago, I was lucky enough to see three adders, out getting a bit of sunshine. They ranged from a pale chocolaty brown and whiteish at one end of the spectrum, to black at the other, with something in between, for good measure.

Prior to that, I thought their colouring was all pretty standard, but no: I discovered that they come in a variety of shades. I don't know about reddish ones being particularly dangerous; my gut feeling is to keep a good distance between myself, and anything without legs, and with a zig-zag pattern along it's back.

Norm.

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Postby truckyboy » Tue Apr 26, 2011 2:48 pm

Last year, my wife and i visited Russe for a short stay..we as always decided to pay a visit and our respects to her mother who died a short while ago..anyway as bg cemetary`s go, it was overgrown as usual and i started to look amongst the grass and burial sites to try and identify her mothers..with the intention of tidying up, trimming the grass etc...anyway i couldnt find it, and my wife decided to try her luck..i soon heard a very large scream..and looked to see a very large green snake..head raised, and ready to bite..she had fallen and was on her knees across a gravestone, i like a scared rabbit in these situations..just shouted..i ran to the car to grab a rake i had bought with me..but by this time she was up o her feet and ran towards me..crying..shaking..and we never got to see her mothers gravestone...i think she has arranged to have the remains moved to another part of the site where her husband and son are buried, and hopefully wont have to go through that again..at least the new site is free of long grass, and is mostly concrete...otherwise she may have to go it alone..the snake is one of my most feared..i know we had to wait 3 years before her remains were allowed to be moved..and the headstone re-written..

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snakes that are poisonous!

Postby pauly » Wed May 25, 2011 2:58 pm

Hi, Just thought i would share another experience with others, our plot seems to be like a zoo as has not been cultivated for a few years we seem to have everything from large lizards up to 12in long to tortoises, and snakes of all kinds.

We were recently standing on the terrace and i was talking to our BULGARIAN friend about snakes and asking if there are any that will cause me to go to the hospital at warp speed or not when he was saying these are really found in the mountain areas not in BALCHIK, when we looked down and saw a snake next to us, it was a kind of sandy brown colour with light triangular markings along its back, this he said quite alarmed is poisonous and he was very surprised!

I have so far in the last few weeks in our overgrown garden seen about 3 species of snake and one slow worm; i think i shall sell tickets soon.

FAYESY

Postby FAYESY » Wed May 25, 2011 5:14 pm

The snake you describe is an adder - now its not surprising you have seen this snake in the Uk they love woods & gardens. Now the horned viper is the one that loves rocky mountain sides.

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snakes

Postby rodz » Wed May 25, 2011 6:02 pm

I have search the internet to find the name of this snake. I have been to many countries and many jungles buthave never seen it. I was at the cherepiski monestry when I and my daughter saw a cat eating a snake. The snake was jet black with crimson zig zag along its back. How I wish now we had taken a picture

AngloBulgarian

Just how full of Snakes is Bulgaria??

Postby AngloBulgarian » Thu Jun 09, 2011 9:51 am

Hi

Judging by the number of snakes squished every day on the roads near here the country must be absolutely crammed to the gunnels with snakes - I know they go on to the road to warm up in a morning but yesterday i counted 6 withing about 5 km!

They dont stay there long as the birds make off with them so that number was that morning cull. They all appear to be Montpellier Whatsits.

But to ask the question again is Bulgaria absolutely teaming with snakes??

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Re: Just how full of Snakes is Bulgaria??

Postby Moscow_Wolf » Thu Jun 09, 2011 11:04 am

AngloBulgarian wrote:Hi

Judging by the number of snakes squished every day on the roads near here the country must be absolutely crammed to the gunnels with snakes - I know they go on to the road to warm up in a morning but yesterday i counted 6 withing about 5 km!

They dont stay there long as the birds make off with them so that number was that morning cull. They all appear to be Montpellier Whatsits.

But to ask the question again is Bulgaria absolutely teaming with snakes??


I've had about 5 sightings on my land this year so far which is 4 more than last year and I don't go looking for them intentionally. I had a baby one living in my old house, but I think it or, one of its relatives has moved out into my old barn. The remainder, I have seen slithering away after their warming themselves routine has been disturbed.

Last year, my Wife was fortunate to see a live snake get snatched from the road by an Eagle. I would have loved to have witnessed that.

Having a stream down in what is referred to as the 'swamp' must attract lots of snakes as there are hundreds of frogs down there waiting to be eaten, but they in turn should eat the Mosquitoes and hide from the Storks. I have cut paths through this jungle this year so can actually see things where the 3 metre high weeds have been felled and the nettles trimmed down to sandal access level. :lol:

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Postby scot47 » Thu Jun 09, 2011 1:47 pm

We need to set up a "Bulgarian Society for the Protection of Snakes" !


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