Fastish growing trees and shrubs?

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Moscow_Wolf
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Postby Moscow_Wolf » Fri Jun 04, 2010 2:36 am

A very good and informative thread and thank you to the contributors so far. I will need to go look up some of the species mentioned on Google so as to get a picture of them to understand what they could look like.

I have a few questions for you budding horticulturists. I have a very long and open boundary on which I will be placing the usual concrete posts and 5 foot chain link fencing later in the year (once the jungle starts to recede) and I am looking for hedging plants that will be evergreen, provide colour, fruits or berries, a good home for birds and does not require a lot of maintenance in the way of trimming or the need for spraying like Roses do.

I don't want the hedge to be much more than 5-6 feet in height as it would block the view to the Northwest, but my other borders can be higher. I do not like conifers as a border, but do like the appearance of something like Holly, but the species that provides the red berries.

It could be nice to be able to alternate different species so as to keep interest in the hedge, but I need some ideas of plants that I can buy here and ones from which I can make my own cuttings. I was given some privet hedge cuttings (more like just broken off live stems) that she told me to just clean off some of the leaves and stick them in the ground and water them in, but I am nowhere near ready to plant up and have no idea how many of these 'stems' one would plant, I mean, do you plant them in clumps or one stem every half a metre or so - you see, I do not know a lot about such although I am willing and wanting to learn.

In addition, I have a gap in my tree cover and want to plant a couple of fast growing trees (I guess some Pine) to fill the gap so would be grateful for suggestions on that too.

Has anyone planted Pine as a source of firewood as that is something else that I have thought about and have the land to do it?

Sorry for so many questions, but as usual there are a 1001 things to do and think about when building a house and trying to get your plot sorted, protected, in order and producing food and a natural habitat for birds and other wildlife.

Cheers

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Postby Norman-D-Beeches » Fri Jun 04, 2010 4:28 am

not sure about the evergreen, flower/berry-bearing hedging plants MW, as i'm faced with the same problem. i haven't seen holly in bulgaria, though i have seen a smallish evergreen tree with red berries that is similar. maybe bird laurel maight be an answer, but that will try and take over the world, given half a chance.

as far as pine for burning: that's a definite no no. for our first winter here, there was a log truck driver's strike or somesuch, and the wood we'd ordered never arrived. we were forced into using any wood we could find around the place, most of which was scrap stuff which had been ripped out and replaced during the rebuild. of course, most of that was pine.

within a fairly short time, our chimney was pretty well blocked with what looked like black glass.it seems that the pine resin rises with the smoke and heat, then solidifies as it comes into contact with cold air as it's leaving the chimney. it almost sealed the chimney outlet. so, unless you like a smokey atmosphere in your house, i wouldn't go there.

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Postby Norman-D-Beeches » Fri Jun 04, 2010 6:01 am

not sure about the evergreen, flower/berry-bearing hedging plants MW, as i'm faced with the same problem. i haven't seen holly in bulgaria, though i have seen a smallish evergreen tree with red berries that is similar. maybe bird laurel maight be an answer, but that will try and take over the world, given half a chance.

as far as pine for burning: that's a definite no no. for our first winter here, there was a log truck driver's strike or somesuch, and the wood we'd ordered never arrived. we were forced into using any wood we could find around the place, most of which was scrap stuff which had been ripped out and replaced during the rebuild. of course, most of that was pine.

within a fairly short time, our chimney was pretty well blocked with what looked like black glass.it seems that the pine resin rises with the smoke and heat, then solidifies as it comes into contact with cold air as it's leaving the chimney. it almost sealed the chimney outlet. so, unless you like a smokey atmosphere in your house, i wouldn't go there.

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Postby fredatinsch » Fri Jun 04, 2010 6:47 am

Mw - I purchased two small holly bushes here, from a flower shop! One a variegated, cream and dark green and must be a female as its flowered and has berries and a plain green one, which luckily is the male. With Holly you do need, either in your garden or next doors a male tree, or no babies I mean berries.

Holly is slow growing, till they take off then need a bit of pruning , which you can do at Christmas when you bring in the holly Its the evergreen bit that is causing me problems. You say you do not like conifers. But there are some beautiful species, shapes and forms, some carrying from green to violet green cones. You may have to be content with cover from climbers and small trees and shrubs from early spring till Christmas, then hopefully you will get the usual snow and will not be able to see far anyway!!.

My choice would be a climbing Hydrangea, honeysuckle,a clematis or two, Partenocissus tricuspidata, or Japanese Ivy, beautiful red and crimson leaves in the Autumn. This will cover large expanses. In front of these perhaps an evergreen Elaegnus, yellow and green leaves. Cotoneaster and Forsythia. A Berberi. , they are evergreen too. Aucuba looks like a spotted Laurel, evergreen. Cytisus or broom.
Then towards the front smaller shrubs and perennials.

There will be nothing like an instant hedge or garden come to that, but the sooner you get them in the ground the sooner you will get results. As for your privet, put them in a spare piece of dug over ground, weed free about eight inches apart, keep watered, provide a bit of shade may be. When they get to a size you can actually say you have a bush, not too big mind, about 15-18 inches, dig up with plenty of soil and put in final position. Do this in October.
Trawl the internet, get an idea of what trees and shrubs ect you like then keep an eye out to see if they grow local, or ask on here. Get to Nurseries and plant centre's at different times of the year to see what is in leaf or flower. Gardeners are usually a generous lot, especially when you take an interest in their gardens, they like to share so get making some gardening friends, thats my advice.

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Postby Tiarnan » Fri Jun 04, 2010 8:44 am

Hi all
a friend of ours who only comes to Bulgaria for 3 months a year has asked me to enquire about ivy. She has a wall around her house....never built or plastered properly....and for the last 4 years she has had it painted on the inside. Each year when she comes back 90% of the paint is off and she has to repaint. As you will understand she is getting a bit cheesed off with this. She thought that if she planted ivy along the length of the wall it would give cover and even some protection without the need for ongoing painting. Does any of you experts know if this would be feasible and would ivy be available to buy and plant at this time of year.

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Postby scot47 » Fri Jun 04, 2010 9:11 am

I have seen ivy on a couple of houses in Madara. Not sure if you could buy it. Just ask someone for a cutting !

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Postby Biker » Fri Jun 04, 2010 10:17 am

Hi MW,
RE your privet
I only just learned about hardwood cuttings as I am the lazy type who has to buy all new plants.

Recent gardening program stated "take a piece of the woody plant, trim off the bottom leaves stick it in the ground and next year you will have a new plant,
The thing I was most interested in was that he said you also do this with roses and next year you have a new plant.

I am wondering about sticking some cut roses , from asda ,into the ground to see what happens. As at this time of year you often see new fresh growth sprouting on them as cut flowers sit in water.
Apparantly straight cut at bottom and slopped cut at top

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Postby Moscow_Wolf » Fri Nov 26, 2010 5:34 pm

It has taken me a while to find the damned thread I was looking for, but eventually did and someone recommended: - Photinia - Red Robin which can be viewed here: - http://www.hedginguk.com/photinia.html

Has anyone planted it here in Bulgaria? If yes, how has it done so far and can you buy it here?

Still not got around to planting any hedging plants yet as I haven't decided what kind of boundary to have as in wall and wrought iron or concrete post and wire fence, but this is for an internal decorative barrier of about 10 metres in length. I'd have to rip out the existing mish mash of things that have died or grow too fast and are not pretty, but now is about the time to do it I guess.

I cannot remember now as I am posting what damned thread this is as I've searched so many. Where is the THREAD title to be seen?

So, perhaps going off thread slightly, but I want your advice on 4 shrubs that would look pretty on the corners of a Gazebo. They'd have to stay in planters as they'd be on a concrete foundation. I was thinking something like a Lemon Tree, but your ideas and experiences are most welcome.

Thank you.

Moscow 'Wood Worm' Wolf.

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Postby Moscow_Wolf » Thu Feb 24, 2011 10:41 am

A little parcel of useful information that I collected from a local last week. I have a rather large piece of land that slopes downwards from my house and right down the bottom a freshwater stream flows nicely through it. Due to neglect over the years many trees (I believe part of the Willow family, but not sure as I can only identify from bark at this time of year) have fallen causing blockages to the water's flow and makes the whole area a swamp during heavy rain or after a snow melt.

During my first year here, I sometimes saw the Roma down there with horse and cart hacking away at the trees, but that was before I found out that the swamp area is mine and have long put a stop to that little lark.

Anyway, I was down there with my chainsaw cutting the fallen trees when a local came by and at first was a little aggressive until he realised it was me and I was on my own land. He showed me where to break off (you could cut, but he said it was better to break the vertical shoots off at their base by bending them back) and just push them into the ground 10-12 centimetres. He reckons that in 2-3 years that I will have grown trees and never need to buy firewood again.

Well, since that piece of advice, every time I walk the dogs and see fallen trees I have been carrying out his advice and planting still live off-shoots along my route. He said that they wouldn't grow up on higher ground as I guess they need the water supply to keep them growing. I am just hoping that if I manage to plant enough and eventually clear the stream from debris that these trees will grow and might even be enough to drain the swamp into more acceptable land.

If I don't try, I'll never know, but useful information for me. What do you lot think?

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Postby tandt » Thu Feb 24, 2011 11:46 am

Hi MW,
I think that's a great idea. Look into 'coppicing' - willow is ideal for this and makes a good firewood when well seasoned. 2 - 3 years is a little optimistic, though. It will take around 6 - 7 years for the new trees to make decent sized logs, then every 5- 6 years coppiced. If you can get hold of some ash saplings, plant some of those, ( but not too near the water ), as these are also good for coppicing and makes the best firewood, ( it can be burned straight away if needed, as it only contains around 20 % moisture ).
Happy arboring !
Trev.


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