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Posted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 4:34 pm
by Moscow_Wolf
spantrout wrote:Condensation to me indicates poor construction, but i'm no builder!!!!


I'm no builder (by profession either), but if you live in any form of a box without adequate ventilation, you will get condensation. Next time that you're out in the cold and you can see your own breath, this is what you get in your living box. It just don't go away without a fresh air supply or perhaps, extreme sauna type dry heat.

I have NO idea how much or how little water vapour the wood burning stove churns out. I am aware of how much calor gas heaters throw out insofar as we had to use them to heat our homes in Northern Ireland (no natural gas back then), or pay stupid money in electricity for old fashioned storage heaters full of bricks. The water vapour and condensation would stream down the walls and have to be sponged otherwise mould would form.

Even if you sleep outside in a tent at this time of year, the inside of the roof will have some condensation just from the fact that you are breathing and exhaling air.

Posted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 4:38 pm
by karenm
Moscow_Wolf wrote:
spantrout wrote:Condensation to me indicates poor construction, but i'm no builder!!!!


I'm no builder (by profession either), but if you live in any form of a box without adequate ventilation, you will get condensation. Next time that you're out in the cold and you can see your own breath, this is what you get in your living box. It just don't go away without a fresh air supply or perhaps, extreme sauna type dry heat.

I have NO idea how much or how little water vapour the wood burning stove churns out. I am aware of how much calor gas heaters throw out insofar as we had to use them to heat our homes in Northern Ireland (no natural gas back then), or pay stupid money in electricity for old fashioned storage heaters full of bricks. The water vapour and condensation would stream down the walls and have to be sponged otherwise mould would form.

Even if you sleep outside in a tent at this time of year, the inside of the roof will have some condensation just from the fact that you are breathing and exhaling air.


wood maybe 25% water maybe a bit more, would have thought that evaporated up the chimney along with the smoke

Posted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 4:42 pm
by Moscow_Wolf
karenm wrote:
Moscow_Wolf wrote:
spantrout wrote:Condensation to me indicates poor construction, but i'm no builder!!!!


I'm no builder (by profession either), but if you live in any form of a box without adequate ventilation, you will get condensation. Next time that you're out in the cold and you can see your own breath, this is what you get in your living box. It just don't go away without a fresh air supply or perhaps, extreme sauna type dry heat.

I have NO idea how much or how little water vapour the wood burning stove churns out. I am aware of how much calor gas heaters throw out insofar as we had to use them to heat our homes in Northern Ireland (no natural gas back then), or pay stupid money in electricity for old fashioned storage heaters full of bricks. The water vapour and condensation would stream down the walls and have to be sponged otherwise mould would form.

Even if you sleep outside in a tent at this time of year, the inside of the roof will have some condensation just from the fact that you are breathing and exhaling air.


wood maybe 25% water maybe a bit more, would have thought that evaporated up the chimney along with the smoke


What about the 'smoke' that comes into the house! :lol:

Okay, I'm out of here, I obviously live in badly designed house with a bad heating engineer, **** wood burning stove, bad wood, too short a chimney. I'm so depressed by it all that I'm going to sleep outside in my hammock with a natural wood burning fire contained within rocks. :wink:

Posted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 4:44 pm
by spantrout
MW i accept fully what u are saying, i have a friend with the same problem.

the problem of condensation is that where hot meets cold, badly insulated properties suffer because the cold walls meet hot air, windows, cold glass meets hot air, ceilings, cold concrete meets hot air. Insulation reduces cold/hot surfaces

yes breathing causes moisture, but unless u want to stop breathing then i still suggest the windows don't do what they should or the insulation don't do what it should!

Do u boil a lot of food? (steam)
Do u boil the kettle a lot? (steam)
Do u take baths/showers regularly? (steam)
All these thing contribute to condensation, ( not to accuse you of being unclean :lol: )
but it seems to me, that a lot of BG constructed houses, indeed the apartment I lived in for a year in varna (which was only 2 yrs old) was black mouldy), this is not about adequate ventilation (it helps greatly of course) but if u have surfaces of a structure which cause condensation without ur knowledge, because of poor consruction materials, u'll never get rid!

Posted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 4:50 pm
by spantrout
MW wrote
What about the 'smoke' that comes into the house!


if it's on a regular basis u have a problem

if it's like mine 3 or 4 times a year then it's just dependant on the direction and strength of the wind.

I can have a window open with fire lit, wind changes, smoke out of front of fire, close window, problem gone!

Posted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 4:51 pm
by Slaphead
As I understand it MW, your house is sparkly and new. Pound to a pinch of wotsit that it's still drying out.

Posted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 5:01 pm
by spantrout
yes but that don't explain everything slaphead, i had an 80m2 concrete slab, new plaster on walls but an open roof, only drips were from roof, not running down walls!

Posted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 5:31 pm
by Moscow_Wolf
spantrout wrote:yes but that don't explain everything slaphead, i had an 80m2 concrete slab, new plaster on walls but an open roof, only drips were from roof, not running down walls!


It is NOT running down the walls and never has. All I can say is that up above head height, I see 'water marks' that will wipe off, but I assume these marks occurred during the night as they're above where we sleep.

I don't understand what could be wrong with my double glazed windows although, I know that they're not the best as I went on a recommendation of good and cheap which turned out to be only. CHEAP.

On later added double glazing windows on terraces (that were planned to be open until I experienced my first winter in the new house), these windows have special catchment areas for condensation and never do I see these windows steamed up.

It is all very difficult to explain in writing as somebody will no doubt say that I have a damp problem which I do not. If I did have water streaming down the walls, I would investigate the cause, all I am saying is that with all the insulation and no fresh air, (or not enough fresh air) you/I will get condensation. Perhaps on a water based paint finish, you wouldn't notice it, but on a kitchen/bathroom washable Dulux paint, you do see the water marks and more so when they're dirty from fire smoke, dust or whatever you wish to call it.

Yes, electric kettles, gas rings, but electric oven, hot showers, but cooker hood and extractor fans for both kitchen and bathroom to the outside air.

No problem in the spring, summer and autumn when most windows are open with fly screens, only during these few short cold months when windows are mainly closed except during the odd clear day when I can open them. :wink:

Posted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 5:39 pm
by Slaphead
As I said earlier, condensation is a topic all of it's own.
What I didn't mention earlier is this. Since I carried out the improvements to the flu system on our fire, the dust levels have reduced dramatically. It's noticeable when taking the ask container out to empty. Any ash dust that emerges from the tray is sucked up the chimney. The roof's probably covered but that's another story....

Posted: Sun Jan 08, 2012 5:42 pm
by spantrout
u ain't lounging about on the roof with ur beer/rakia/big fat cigar are u?, so who cares about the roof! :lol: