Foot and Mouth disease

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SooToo
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Foot and Mouth disease

Postby SooToo » Tue Jan 11, 2011 8:24 am

Thought someone would have picked this up but I can't find anything so here it is. First case of FMD for 12 years and now 37 cases identified.

Fingers crossed they've got it under control as would hate to see everyone losing their animals.


http://www.novinite.com/search_news.php ... th+disease

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Postby Simonita » Tue Jan 11, 2011 10:49 am

Quite worrying in a country largely without fences and hedges. Not sure that the measures being taken (slaughter of domestic hooved animals) are likely to be effective if it is true that the outbreak came from wild boar. What do others think?

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Postby Moscow_Wolf » Tue Jan 11, 2011 11:08 am

Simonita wrote:Quite worrying in a country largely without fences and hedges. Not sure that the measures being taken (slaughter of domestic hooved animals) are likely to be effective if it is true that the outbreak came from wild boar. What do others think?


I'm no Farmer, but it appears to be a a nightmare scenario when most sheep, goats and cows share the same common grazing lands. Plus, if the farmers are forced to keep their livestock in their barns then, there is probably not enough stored hay for them to eat as they most probably rely on the natural grass especially during the so far, mild winter we are having.

I am not sure though about large herd farmers as I had the impression that the herds were formed from lots of privately owned cows and sheep that return to their owners after a day's grazing. Still, it would be a great loss to a lot of Bulgarian's who are already close too or on the bread-line.

I think that most 1-2 year old Pigs have been slaughtered in the villages for food by now, but I don't know about those in the factories which must be an on-going chain of new and older animals.

Bulgaria and its inhabitants could well do without this outbreak.

Pascalcho

Postby Pascalcho » Tue Jan 11, 2011 1:03 pm

Simonita wrote:Quite worrying in a country largely without fences and hedges. Not sure that the measures being taken (slaughter of domestic hooved animals) are likely to be effective if it is true that the outbreak came from wild boar. What do others think?


If i'm correct is doesn't come from something but from somewhere.
Turkey to be precise.

And apparently it is spreading. I hope the Bulgarians can isolate it, contrary to the Turkish neighbors.

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Postby mickw » Tue Jan 11, 2011 2:14 pm

We have 13 cows and 7 Calves to worry about, even though no reports in our area we are taking precautions, and if the worst comes we are insured against it. Eileens confined Lucky our sheep to Barracks, no walkies to the shop until it blows over.
Although we are in a low risk area, things can change in an instant. Our animals are clear at the moment, and we are fortunate enough to be able to let them out the sheds into a safe area that we can control access to, via disinfectant crossings. We also have enough supplies of fodder to be able not to let them out to graze the open countryside. Something most of our fellow villagers cannot do, they have to let them open graze. Which turns our situation into a catch 22, if someone elses animals in our area become infected, then the whole areas animals would have to be culled, in spite of any efforts we undertake.We are trying to get the other owners that have to graze open land, to exit and enter the village via our disinfectant pads.Fingers crosssed at the moment.


Mick

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Postby Keegan » Tue Jan 11, 2011 2:36 pm

Good luck Mick. I live in a rural area in Uk and remember only too well the outbreak here a few years ago and all the horrible events that went with it. We're not far from you in Savino.

best wishes Kath

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Postby Moscow_Wolf » Tue Jan 11, 2011 3:02 pm

mickw wrote:We also have enough supplies of fodder to be able not to let them out to graze the open countryside. Something most of our fellow villagers cannot do, they have to let them open graze. Which turns our situation into a catch 22, if someone elses animals in our area become infected, then the whole areas animals would have to be culled, in spite of any efforts we undertake.We are trying to get the other owners that have to graze open land, to exit and enter the village via our disinfectant pads.Fingers crosssed at the moment.


Mick


Insured or not, I guess nobody wants to see their animals destroyed. Would be interesting to know how you get on with trying to get other animal owners to use your disinfectant pads and just how serious they are taking this threat. I assume that it is all over Bulgarian radio and TV stations.

Lets hope your area stays clear of this damned disease.

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Postby Simonita » Tue Jan 11, 2011 3:21 pm

11-01-2011/16:06
Brussels - The European Union can compensate up to 60 per cent of the losses Bulgarian farmers have sustained due to an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), European Commission health spokesman Frederic Vincent said here Tuesday. The European Commission intends to send to Bulgaria in the coming days vets from the European veterinary emergency team to prvide any assistance the Bulgarian authorities may need. The Commission is ready to offer other support, if needed, said Vincent.

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Postby mickw » Tue Jan 11, 2011 3:47 pm

Hi MW,

At the moment about 50% are taking it seriously, the normal,no problem mindset is prevailing at the moment. This may well change in the days to come when 500 animals are in the process of being culled as we speak,in the village at the point of origin nicknamed now the village of Bones. Already 200 meat and dairy suppliers have closed in certain ares, Burgus,Varna, Yambol and Haskovo amongst them.There is compensation available for lost animals, however it will be a long drawn out process and will never compensate fully, either in monetary terms or time taken to establish a herd, revenue from milk will be lost and when compensation comes through, some will find other things to spend the money on rather than risk losses in possible further outbreaks. Supply of replacement animals will also be an issue as movement from other areas will be restricted, and will have to come from outside the affected areas, and prices will be sky high.

Mick

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Postby Simonita » Tue Jan 11, 2011 5:16 pm

Last farmer to be affected in the UK is an uncle of Mrs Simonita. Compensation he (eventually) got was for the market value of the cattle, not its value as dressed meat sold through his farm shop. As for the dressed meat already in his shop & freezers (which was also destroyed) - not a bean! As Mickw says, the real costs came later with trying to rebuild the herd. You may recall that after prolonged attempts to blame this outbreak on an American company, the UK government eventually came clean and admitted the outbreak had come from its own labs.

You do have to wonder how the BG authorities can be so sure that the offending wild boar came from Turkey.


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