Chedder Cheese Please!

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pollypepper
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Cheese

Postby pollypepper » Mon Dec 13, 2010 8:35 pm

The Smoked Kashkaval is nice if you like smoked cheeses. There are a few different makes. You can tell them by the brown skin or crust on the outside.Love it on Pasta or chips. We only now buy the smoked Kashkaval as it at least has a strong taste

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Re: Bulgarian Cheese

Postby RainbowBG » Mon Dec 13, 2010 9:12 pm

elaine48 wrote: Only fault I find is that they never quite taste the same each time you buy it. Don't think they have mastered consistency yet. [/list]


We have become so used to mass produced Factory food, that we forget that a more traditional, home made cheese will never be exactly the same each and every time you make it.

Personally I find the slight differences in home made cheese much more interested and pleasant to the pallet.

Although I do love mature cheddar, but can live without it especially at the price we have to pay here in BG.

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shazzy
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Postby shazzy » Mon Dec 13, 2010 10:21 pm

we have bought english cheddar in bg the last time from kaufland you have to ask for it and they also do pre packed serously strong cheddar.

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Seedy
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Postby Seedy » Mon Dec 13, 2010 10:29 pm

The vast majority of British cheeses, even the poncy "artisan" ones, taste much like soap. Blame the 'elf'n'safety bunch or whatever, but I guess that they just make the muck to as low a quality as they can get away with. "Seriously strong" is nothing of the sort but thank goodness the Canadians can still make decent cheddar - and with unpasteurised milk! :lol:

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shazzy
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Postby shazzy » Mon Dec 13, 2010 10:46 pm

Seedy wrote:The vast majority of British cheeses, even the poncy "artisan" ones, taste much like soap. Blame the 'elf'n'safety bunch or whatever, but I guess that they just make the muck to as low a quality as they can get away with. "Seriously strong" is nothing of the sort but thank goodness the Canadians can still make decent cheddar - and with unpasteurised milk! :lol:

the cheddar i get taste much better than the cheeses in bg iam a veggie and eat tons of cheese this is the best ive found in bg,also in yambol theres a shop thats on this site that sells good cheese .

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Simonita
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Cheese

Postby Simonita » Tue Dec 14, 2010 9:07 am

Much kashkaval is made from corn oil, and tastes if it were made from engine oil. It is possible to get the genuine article (ie, something that has been somewhere near a cow) but it is often expensive. We tend to buy Dutch or French cheeses in BG. A major recent breakthrough was the discovery of madjouli, which is a very acceptable BG version of halloumi. Only cheddar we have seen is "Seriously Mild" and so not worth bothering with.

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Postby fredatinsch » Tue Dec 14, 2010 11:56 am

I did pick up Singletons Stripy Jack, Layers of Red Leicester, Double Gloucester, Lancashire Cheddar and Cheshire Cheese. I have found my tastes changing, I now enjoy blue cheese, smoked and all the dutch types. Working my way through the cheese counter.

When we first arrived we loved the Seriously Mild, only because we could not get or did not know how to ask or where to buy other cheeses. It did take the edge off the yearning, sometimes buy it to cook with.

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Original or Not?

Postby RainbowBG » Tue Dec 14, 2010 8:14 pm

The major issue with any style of cheese such as Cheddar or Stilton for instance that we all know and love, that is made in another Country will certainly never taste exactly the same, as Somerset where Cheddar is made as you will all know has good rainfall and excellent pasture, which gives the cheese it’s distinctive taste.

So will expats get used to a different taste of Cheddar or only be able to accept the original? If the latter, then the only way to get that real Cheddar taste is to eat the original made in Somerset and imported; hence the price.

Even good pasture here in Bulgaria will result in a different taste than the original Somerset, the real question I guess is to make something similar at a reasonable price that we get used to and also come to love?

Mature cheddar of course takes up to 18 months to ripen. So making it and keeping it at home is a bit of an issue.

To make it in any quantity would require a large investment.

However an acceptable recognisable Cheddar taste can be obtained in around 5 / 6 months.

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bullador
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Postby bullador » Tue Dec 14, 2010 8:54 pm

Anyone who wants to pay 5.95 lvs for a very small square of cheese from Kaufland want their heads examining. I know every one to their own, but that is a ridiculous price for cheese and it hasnt got much taste at that. I buy the slices that say they are for toast because they melt when put onto my bread and they are a make do. I am not a cheapskate but I will not be ripped off.

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amron
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Postby amron » Wed Dec 15, 2010 6:51 am

just to add a bit of information in Uk a similar cheese(edam v kashkaval) is 5.30pounds to 8.00 per kilo.
do measure it by the kilo as weights/size vary.
I agree with you about feeling fleeced though (sometimes not always) comparing water bills "i rejoice over it" !!


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