treatment of dogs in bulgaria ~ pt 2

Discuss here anything that does not already have its own Forum.

Moderator: Moderator

Sell Overseas Property
Cash For Your Property
User avatar
thedichingang
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 164
Location: Dichin village

Postby thedichingang » Sun Dec 23, 2007 8:41 pm

often wondered why the kennel club condoned the 'destruction' of so many true breeds. i understand some recent champion breed altered so drastically for appearance/style? can now only give birth by caesarian section. still natural caesarian section is now a 'new fad' with many in the delivery profession for women/mums to be. what do women really make of this?
i ask the ladies because the female dogs did not have a voice or choice in the genetic alterations made to improve their lot.

i have yet to see a genuine hunting breed in BG. Am i just not seeing them or going to the wrong areas. i wondered just how many Bulgarians bred or work such dogs.
A good friend of mine breeds pedigree working dogs, the bone and muscle structure is magnificent to behold. sadly i do not feel able to bring such a quality dog to BG with the high number of mongrel mixes which are found in almost every village. there are no working dogs in my village.
any thoughts out there?

Sell Overseas Property
Cash For Your Property
User avatar
leedarkwood
Mega User!
Mega User!
Posts: 5139
Contact:

Postby leedarkwood » Mon Dec 24, 2007 6:57 am

Here on the Western edge of the Rhodope mountains we have a local hunting breed, used to flush out boar and other game, they look rather like an otterhound.

There are lots of pedigree dogs now though mainly in the cities and big towns. Our three beardied collies create a lot of interest everywhere we take them!

Lee

Sell Overseas Property
Cash For Your Property
User avatar
tanko
<b>Property Management</b>
Posts: 13
Location: pazardzhik

Postby tanko » Sat Dec 29, 2007 4:43 pm

everybody is moaning about the dogs and cats why dont we all try and help in some way,in our village we have a lady who has made it her goal in life to to see that she has all the cats and dogs neutered,she go's around the village and collects dogs and cats then takes them down to plovdiv where she has a good vet who gives her a good discount 3 cats 15 lev1dog 30 levs, i think she has now nearly completed her task and we are nearley an animal sterile village, she has paid for this out of her own pocket as she was so upset with seeing so many animals in distress,,not only has she done this but she has now got in total 14 dogs and 8 cats that she has found abandoned at the side of the road,many needing urgent vetinary care
all of her dogs and cats are up to date with all necessary jabs ect and need re housing if anybody is willing to re home please contact and we can arrange something

Sell Overseas Property
Cash For Your Property
User avatar
rgawith
Super User!
Super User!
Posts: 687

attitude

Postby rgawith » Sat Dec 29, 2007 4:56 pm

Whilst I agree with bikergal that much is down to money, it is also a cultural thing. Most Bulgarians see stray dogs and mongrels as worth nothing, except as guard dogs to be chained up. They have a strange attitude that pedigree dogs are some how worth keeping and spending money on, while mongrels are left to starve and die. Loads of people in the city have pampered pooches but they are all pedigree things - mainly fighting dogs like bulldogs etc or tiny little rat like things.

No-one would have a mongrel in the city as a pet as would get laughed at as I understand it. Very strange attitude and one that needs to change.

Sell Overseas Property
Cash For Your Property
User avatar
millomgirl
Mega User!
Mega User!
Posts: 1578

Re: attitude

Postby millomgirl » Sat Dec 29, 2007 5:24 pm

rgawith wrote:Whilst I agree with bikergal that much is down to money, it is also a cultural thing. Most Bulgarians see stray dogs and mongrels as worth nothing, except as guard dogs to be chained up. They have a strange attitude that pedigree dogs are some how worth keeping and spending money on, while mongrels are left to starve and die. Loads of people in the city have pampered pooches but they are all pedigree things - mainly fighting dogs like bulldogs etc or tiny little rat like things.


Yes, I have noticed this, too. Our neighbours have a Staffordshire bull terrier who is very much a pet dog - kept in the house, made a fuss of etc. They also have two other dogs, small ones, who are left mainly chained up outside, and are treated like nothing, and ignored. A dog is a dog, surely? I don't understand how they can lavish so much love and attention on one, and yet ignore the other two. Strange indeed!

Sell Overseas Property
Cash For Your Property
User avatar
diane
Not 'so' Newbie!
Not 'so' Newbie!
Posts: 32
Location: Rudozem
Contact:

Postby diane » Fri Jan 18, 2008 7:17 pm

We came to live in Bulgaria last August. The children were given strict instructions not to encourage any street dogs as we have enough with our own cats and 4 dogs. However my youngest son witnessed a group of village children throwing stones and firing bb guns at a dog. The dog already had a lopsided head and his face was partially paralised. My son was told by one child that someone had smashed the dogs skull with a large stone. His young heart went out to the dog and he tried to make friends with it. The dog was scared and would have nothing to do with him or any human for that matter. If only things had stayed that way.........
After a while the dog started to go to him then eventually started following him back to the house we were renting and would sleep outside waiting for him.
After a few months we moved into our own house and the dog followed. We tried to shoo him away and he wouldnt go. He then decided he was going to be territorial and bark at everyone who walked past our house. We had local children teasing him, old ladies hitting him with sticks and people firing shotguns at him. They were also shouting at us to keep the dog on a chain even though we did try to explain that he wasnt our dog.
After the dog was shot twice in one day we thought we had no choice but to put him on a chain next to a shed in our garden. We couldnt have him in the house because of our own dogs and he could jump the garden fence.
However due to the odd shape of his head he can slip the tightest collar which then meant he had to be kept in the shed and taken for regular walks. Unfortunately the dog hasnt forgotten who was cruel to him and managed to jump at a girl when my son was walking him. She wasnt bitten but it did give her a scare.
We made the heartbreaking decision that the dog would have to be put down as we couldnt take the chance that he might escape and go for someone also we felt we were being cruel keeping him shut up and he could look out and see our dogs running round the garden.
My husband went to ask the police if they could do anything and was told they didnt do anything with street dogs. One of them did tell him to take the dog to a village 15km away and it would cost 30 lev to have him put down. My husband took the dog early in the morning and we had the terrible job of telling the kids. We were both very upset as he was a young healthy dog but at least I wasnt going to have anyone firing shotguns near my house. Little did I know. The dog turned up at the door three days later, very tired and very hungry. I dont know if he was passed on as a security dog and escaped or how long it took him to find his way back and why he would even want to come back knowing he was going to be locked up. I suppose the answer to that is that even though we couldnt give him the best life, we weren't cruel to him. Anyway later that day I saw a man at our gate and went out to see what he wanted. I was horrified to see he had a handgun. He then started shouting at me. My husband was out at the time and I couldnt understand what he was saying. I was very shaken up and spent the whole night in tears wishing I was back in Scotland.
The outcome is we are now planning to put high fencing around part of the garden so the dog cant escape, and I'm trying harder to learn Bulgarian so if anyone with a handgun is shouting at me, I have some idea of what they are saying.
I know this is a very long story but worth telling if it saves someone else the heartache we have been through. They always say wild animals become a danger when they lose their fear of people. So if you see a street dog that's timid and scared, sometimes its better to leave it that way.

Sell Overseas Property
Cash For Your Property
User avatar
scot47
Mega User!
Mega User!
Posts: 9517
Location: Clyde Estuary
Contact:

Postby scot47 » Sat Jan 19, 2008 7:09 am

Diane
It looks to me that you did not get off to a very good start with your neighbours. Maybe you should have a discussion with them with the help of someone who can interpret for you.

And try to see things from the villager's point of view. They live in a harsh environment where street dogs are a real danger to humans.

Sell Overseas Property
Cash For Your Property
User avatar
sophette
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 50
Contact:

Postby sophette » Sat Jan 19, 2008 7:49 am

i used to think the government scheme of neutering the animal and replacing them on the streets was humane - at least they got a chance at life, but now i am not sure....perhaps it is better to destroy the dogs rather than neuter them. what is humane about seeing dogs starving to death on the streets, packing up and becoming intimidating and dangerous, or subject to taunting and bullying?

Sell Overseas Property
Cash For Your Property
User avatar
mariok
Senior Member
Senior Member
Posts: 144
Location: Near Plovdiv

Postby mariok » Sat Jan 19, 2008 9:38 am

Hi Diane,
I read your story and I cannot believe the cruelty of some people and I have to say that is my biggest fear of coming to live in BG. How you described the treatment of that stray dog in your village is disgusting and makes me so angry at the shear brutality of some people.

In my village I guess we are quite lucky as we don't have many strays and the ones that are stray the locals seem to feed them, so not all villages are the same. I have two dogs at my house and my neighbors look after them when we are here in the UK. Good luck with your stray and don't be bullied into doing things you don't want to by anyone. Its your house, you do what you like and ignore anyone who doesn't like it. Scots right though, you have to be firm with them and tell them, you must not let them push you about, otherwise it will not stop. Take Care

P.S. Just seen you dog picture in your gallery, he looks lovely and your son seems to have found a new best friend!

Sell Overseas Property
Cash For Your Property
User avatar
LUCI
Super User!
Super User!
Posts: 1130
Location: Felton, Northumberland

Postby LUCI » Sat Jan 19, 2008 10:52 am

there is still a wide gap between our ideas on domestic animals and those of many (but not all) Bulgarian - as Scot47 stated many bulgarian villagers live in a harsh environment where, by all accounts, many struggle to feed themselves let alone stray animals. I care for animals and have horses and dogs in the Uk and always have had, but I have learnt to respect the different culture which currently exists in Bg in relation to this topic, I dont like to see any cruelty and if I can do anything I would, but there is a limit as to how far we can interfere with other peoples way of living. I think that due to the large numbers of street dogs, particularly in the cities, that it is kinder for them to be put to sleep than to be neutered and released.


Return to “General Discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 37 guests